Culture Shock 8.0: Sold Out

Sophie Kalakailo, Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Culture Shock 8.0 sold out on Feb. 9, and, once again, did not fail to amaze its audience. Culture Shock is an annual charity event occurring at Farmington High School wherein student groups perform dances inspired from numerous cultures.

Each year, Culture Shock benefits a charity group of choice. This year, 60 percent of proceeds went to Palav, an organization working to save infants with weak lungs. Over one million infants die from respiratory diseases due to the lack of access to basic medical facilities.

The primarily student organized event that opens participation to all interested in performing. Boards from North Farmington and Farmington High School divide responsibilities. Namratha Bujala, president of the FHS 2018-2019 Culture Shock Board, participated in her last Culture Shock this year as a senior. Bujala especially values the charitable nature of the event.

“The biggest thing we want to do is make sure, that of course we have a good show, but as well as a big enough show to go to charity,” Bujala explained. ¨That’s what we valued the most, that people knew the charity that it was going to.¨

With senior hosts Luke Braska and Emily Peterson, the night kicked off with Antoine McCoy, 12, performing the National Anthem. The North Farmington Step Team followed his performance as the first dance routine of the night. Desi Girls, an all female group, had multiple sub-groups with dances from northern India, central India, and southern India and finally “Fusion,” a combination of multiple regions. The Michigan Lion Dance then filled the auditorium with the percussive sound of drums and traditional, colorful lion costumes. Then, all the way from Michigan State University, Badmaash, an all-male dance team performed.

The Lion Dance is a form of traditional Chinese dance. Traditionally, it is performed at the New Year for good luck

Preceding intermission was a fashion show exemplifying numerous countries and cultures. Performed by a coed dance group, a traditional Albanian dance followed the fashion show. The Butter Boys, an all-male group from all three high schools followed. K-Pop dances from groups such as North Korisma ft. Roseoul and the Farmington Jem wowed the audience, and finally a coed performance of students from all three high schools concluded the night.

Sophia Kalakailo
A Kpop dance performed by North Korisma ft. Roseoul.

 

Sophia Kalakailo
Coed dance group concludes the event. Coed was a finale of sorts, featuring students from previous performances

Madison Hales, a performer in Desi Girls and the coed dance group and a senior at FHS, participated in her first and last Culture Shock this year.

“Culture Shock was such an amazing experience. It was a lot of fun to learn new types of dancing and be immersed into a different culture than mine,” commented Hales.

Although Bujala will not participate in on the Culture Shock board next year, she still encourages attendance.

“Just come out to the show next year,” said Bujala. “It’s for a good cause and it’s fun, so why not?”